Accessing queer spaces

We as a community understand that, it’s the active listening, fundraising, and making these alterations which is the really important matter - especially regarding smaller businesses. The excuse however, which I often hear being brought up, is using the mere fact you are a small business to deflect criticism about inaccessibility. Just because you’re a small business, doesn’t mean you can’t actively do all you can within your means to acquire support and ensure you’re as accommodating to a large minority. 

Appointment prep: a symptom of ableism

We're often told that "we treat symptoms, and don't like to label people", however I absolutely disagree with this sentiment. It's nonsensical, if there are apparent and physical symptoms of a condition or comorbid conditions and you are purposefully undiagnosed because they don't like to 'label' you, this is so inherently ableist, and I think because you hear this rhetoric so frequently, especially in paediatric care, that it's important to unpick and discuss what's actually at play when they say this, and how it can feed into, and reinforce a patient's internalised ableism.

Vaccinated – finally a prick I’m happy to have met

Pulling up in the carpark of our local day hospital, I felt a surge of excitement along with an overwhelming sense of bittersweet relief. Like many disabled people, I had to fight for my vaccine as I wasn’t considered as vulnerable enough to receive a live saving jab, but vulnerable enough to be advised to shield indoors, like I had been for over an entire year. 

So your friend’s disabled…

I am aware that the vast majority of people who have been actively engaging with my content, are involved in the chronic illness/disabled community - and like every single disabled/less abled person I've had the pleasure of talking with, I have experienced difficulties navigating interabled friendships and relationships in the past, purely because of the lack of understanding, and societal ableism which resides in those who haven't had personal experience with disability prior to the friendship.